Ruth's Blog: 'Again, again!' Why reading to your child every day is a predictor of later reading comprehension

Ruth's Blog: 'Again, again!' Why reading to your child every day is a predictor of later reading comprehension

Did you know that being read to is the most powerful predictor of your child’s future reading comprehension?

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Ruth's Blog: Recycle your carpets - 6 good reasons to disband 'carpet' areas in Key Stage 2

Ruth's Blog: Recycle your carpets - 6 good reasons to disband 'carpet' areas in Key Stage 2

For children from Nursery to Year 2, carpet time helps the teacher bring children together. Teachers read stories, set their expectations for behaviour and teach from the carpet. By Year 3, I urge you to rethink. Here’s why.

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Ruth's Blog: Teaching Comprehension Strategies Alert

Ruth's Blog: Teaching Comprehension Strategies Alert

Alert: Teaching ‘Comprehension strategies’ makes little impact on children’s comprehension.

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Ruth's Blog: Teaching Handwriting in Reception

Ruth's Blog: Teaching Handwriting in Reception

8 dos and 5 don'ts about teaching handwriting in Reception.

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Ruth's Blog: Some joined up thinking about dyslexic children and joined up writing

Ruth's Blog: Some joined up thinking about dyslexic children and joined up writing

Reception teachers show huge relief when I point out that Ofsted doesn’t require them to teach cursive writing. But then they say ‘Isn’t it good for dyslexic children?’

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Ruth's Blog: Handwriting Alert

Ruth's Blog: Handwriting Alert

ALERT! Entry strokes are hindering children’s handwriting progress. Don’t add 'whooshes’ to our handwriting phrases.

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Ruth's Blog: The Right Brain for Reading

Ruth's Blog: The Right Brain for Reading

Read why Jack’s got a reading brain and Daisy hasn’t.

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Ruth's Blog: Whoopsy Daisy

Ruth's Blog: Whoopsy Daisy

Me: How’s Daisy doing? Mark: Not very well, actually. She’s in the bottom group. We’ve just had her end of Year 2 report - it says she’s great at maths but not at reading. The teacher thinks she’s probably dyslexic.

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Ruth's Blog: Why book bands block children's reading progress

Ruth's Blog: Why book bands block children's reading progress

At every talk I give, I ask teachers, “What are the criteria for slicing books into Book Bands?” Over the last 15 years, not one teacher has been able to tell me.

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Ruth's Blog: Cursive Handwriting in Reception - or not?

Ruth's Blog: Cursive Handwriting in Reception - or not?

Ruth makes the case against teaching cursive handwriting to Reception aged children.

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Ruth's Blog: SOS children

Ruth's Blog: SOS children

You’re nearly five. You’ve been in the Reception class for four weeks. It’s Phonics time.

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Ruth's Blog: Stop with silence

Ruth's Blog: Stop with silence

Partner talk is impossible if you can’t get children to stop quickly. It’s the first thing that you have to get right. Using the silent stop signal - across the whole school - is the first step in promoting a culture where children can think out loud, clarify their ideas, reason and argue.

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Ruth's Blog: Let readers fly

Ruth's Blog: Let readers fly

Children’s intellectual progress depends very substantially on their ability to read. The sooner they read, the sooner they will have access to the words and ideas that will ultimately make them better writers. Success at school is predicated on the speed with which children get out of the reading gate - not by the speed they learn to write.

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Ruth's Blog: Hands up any teacher who wants to exclude four-fifths of the class?

Ruth's Blog: Hands up any teacher who wants to exclude four-fifths of the class?

Many schools have banned hands-up but most continue with the tried (and unproven) method, against all the evidence that it harms concentration, disappoints and demoralises.

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Ruth's Blog: Please don't pay children to read

Ruth's Blog: Please don't pay children to read

Children should read because they love reading, not because they are getting paid or rewarded by their teachers. A book can make them feel happy, sad, excited, touched or even angry at times. No sticker or points towards a cinema ticket can provoke such an emotional reaction.

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